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Heart of Darkness

HEART OF DARKNESS

by Joseph Conrad

 Heart of Darkness has been considered for most of this century not only as a literary classic, but as a powerful indictment of the evils of imperialism. It reflects the savage repressions carried out in the Congo by the Belgians in one of the largest acts of genocide committed up to that time. Conrad’s narrator encounters at the end of the story a man named Kurtz, dying, insane, and guilty of unspeakable atrocities. More recently, African critics like Chinua Achebe have pointed out that the story can be read as a racist or colonialist parable in which Africans are depicted as innately irrational and violent, and in which Africa itself is reduced to a metaphor for that which white Europeans fear within themselves. The people of Africa and the land they live in remain inscrutably alien, other. The title, they argue, implies that Africa is the “heart of darkness,” where whites who “go native” risk releasing the “savage” within themselves. Defenders of Conrad sometimes argue that the narrator does not speak in Conrad’s own voice, and that a layer of irony conceals his true views.  (Paul Brians, Department of English, WSU)

Heart of Darkness Assignment: 

HEART OF DARKNESS ASSIGNMENT 2010

 Heart of Darkness Activities and Handouts:

Close Reading Passage

Passage Explication

Carl Jung Shadow

Impressionistic Writing

The Hollow Men

Heart of Darkness Webquest Assignment:

HEART OF DARKNESS WEBQUEST ASSIGNMENT

Heart of Darkness Webquest Link:

http://faculty.gvsu.edu/rozemar/hod/